Discussion:
systemd-resolved violates The Debian Free Software Guidelines
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Martin Hanson
2018-04-30 02:28:07 UTC
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I have posted this bug report https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=896806 that has been rejected by the maintainer.

Maybe I have misunderstood the issue completely, but I do have some experience with legal issues and AFAIK, there IS a problem here.

I am posting this to the mailing list in order to get "more eyes on the issue".

Kind regards
Andrej Shadura
2018-04-30 05:49:38 UTC
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Hi,
Post by Martin Hanson
I have posted this bug report https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=896806 that has been rejected by the maintainer.
Maybe I have misunderstood the issue completely, but I do have some experience with legal issues and AFAIK, there IS a problem here.
I am posting this to the mailing list in order to get "more eyes on the issue".
I believe the replies to the bug report you posted should give you an
answer to this, most importantly, Don’s email.

P.S. For the record, I would trust Yandex much less than Google.
--
Cheers,
Andrej
jonathon
2018-04-30 07:38:49 UTC
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On 04/30/2018 02:28 AM, Martin Hanson wrote:

https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=896806
Post by Martin Hanson
Maybe I have misunderstood the issue completely, but I do have some experience with legal issues and AFAIK, there IS a problem here.
Effective 25 May 2018 it _might_ be a GDPR violation, but that is
probably the closest law (^1) that applies. Furthermore, it would be
Google, not Debian that is in violation.

If you claiming that the _Oracle v Google_ Appellate Court ruling
applies, that is about a different set of circumstances. Furthermore,
that case hasn't been settled, and the previous court decision isn't
necessarily rendered null and void,, because the first time through was
about a different set of legal circumstances, than the second time through.

###

As a practical matter, are there any globally available DNS servers,
whose formal Terms and Conditions of Service are DFSG compliant?

^1: The Philippine privacy statute, might apply, but it is restricted to
The Philippines, and, furthermore, is usually enforced on "not a friend
of the state" status. Besides which, The Philippines can't afford to
piss off a major American corporation, whilst most European countries
can almost afford to do so.

I am not a lawyer.
This is not legal advice.

jonathon
Francesco Poli
2018-04-30 07:55:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin Hanson
I have posted this bug report
https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=896806
that has been rejected by the maintainer.
[...]

While I see a possible privacy issue in using the Google public DNS
servers, I am under the impression that doing so does not require to
accept any Terms of Service.
At least, I failed to spot any hint about that in the
[instructions page](https://developers.google.com/speed/public-dns/docs/using)

So, as others have already pointed out, this does not seem to be a DFSG
issue.

Nonetheless, I would be much happier, if packages in Debian did not
rely on Google (or any other private company's) services as default,
since I think this is not a recommendable strategy.
--
http://www.inventati.org/frx/
There's not a second to spare! To the laboratory!
..................................................... Francesco Poli .
GnuPG key fpr == CA01 1147 9CD2 EFDF FB82 3925 3E1C 27E1 1F69 BFFE
Walter Landry
2018-04-30 03:57:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin Hanson
I have posted this bug report
https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=896806 that has been
rejected by the maintainer.
Maybe I have misunderstood the issue completely, but I do have some
experience with legal issues and AFAIK, there IS a problem here.
I am posting this to the mailing list in order to get "more eyes on the issue".
This is equivalent to providing a default search engine in Firefox or
Chromium. If the software required the use of these external services
in order to provide basic functionality, then you might have an argument
that the software should go into contrib. But that is not the case.
Especially for this bug report, there are many options, packaged by
Debian, for running your own DNS server. Those will be selected by
default if you set up your network correctly. So I am not seeing the
problem here.

Cheers,
Walter Landry

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