Discussion:
IUPAC/InChI-Trust Licence DFSG-Compliant ?
(too old to reply)
Alex Mestiashvili
2018-02-26 12:54:46 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

could you please clarify if the license below can be considered
DFSG-compatible ?

Section 2 doesn't sound very good, but section 3 says that GPL-2+ may be
applied.
Will it be fine to simply state that it is licensed under GPL-2+ and
also include the original license in d/copyright ?

Thank you,
Alex

The PDF version lives here:
http://www.inchi-trust.org/download/105/LICENCE.pdf

-----

IUPAC/InChI-Trust Licence for the
International Chemical Identifier (InChI) Software
("IUPAC/InChI-Trust InChI Licence No. 1.0")


Copyright (c) IUPAC and InChI Trust Limited
This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
under the terms of the
IUPAC/InChI Trust InChI Licence No. 1.0), or (at your option) any later
version.

Terms and Conditions for Copying, Distribution and Modification of the
InChI Software

0. This Licence Agreement applies to any software library or other
program which contains a notice
placed by the copyright holder or other authorized party saying it may
be distributed under the terms of
this Licence. The Licensee is addressed as "you".

'IUPAC' means the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.

A "library" means a collection of software functions and/or data
prepared so as to be conveniently
linked with application programs (which use some of those functions and
data) to form executables.

The "Library", below, refers to any such software library or work
which has been distributed under
these terms. A "work based on the Library" means either the Library or
any derivative work under
copyright law: that is to say, a work containing the Library or a
portion of it, either verbatim or with
modifications and/or translated straightforwardly into another language.
(Hereinafter, translation is
included without limitation in the term "modification".)

"Source code" for a work means the preferred form of the work for
making modifications to it. For a
library, complete source code means all the source code for all modules
it contains, plus any associated
interface definition files, plus the scripts used to control compilation
and installation of the library.

Activities other than copying, distribution and modification are not
covered by this Licence; they are
outside its scope. The act of running a program using the Library is
not restricted, and output from
such a program is covered only if its contents constitute a work based
on the Library (independent of
the use of the Library in a tool for writing it). Whether that is true
depends on what the Library does
and what the program that uses the Library does.

1. You may copy and distribute verbatim copies of the Library's complete
source code as you receive it,
in any medium, provided that you conspicuously and appropriately publish
on each copy an appropriate
copyright notice and disclaimer of warranty; keep intact all the notices
that refer to this Licence and to
the absence of any warranty; and distribute a copy of this Licence along
with the Library.

You may charge a fee for the physical act of transferring a copy, and
you may at your option offer
warranty protection in exchange for a fee.

2. You may modify your copy or copies of the Library or any portion of
it, thus forming a work based
on the Library, and copy and distribute such modifications or work under
the terms of Section 1 above,
provided that you also meet all of these conditions:

a) The modified work must itself be a software library.

b) You must cause the files modified to carry prominent notices stating
that you changed the files and
the date of any change.

c) You must cause the whole of the work to be licensed at no charge to
all third parties under the terms
of this Licence. This requirement does not extend to any "work that
uses the Library" that might also
be compiled or linked against the "work based on the Library."

d) If a facility in the modified Library refers to a function or a table
of data to be supplied by an
application program that uses the facility, other than as an argument
passed when the facility is invoked,
then you must make a good faith effort to ensure that, in the event an
application does not supply such
function or table, the facility still operates, and performs whatever
part of its purpose remains
meaningful.

(For example, a function in a library to compute square roots has a
purpose that is entirely well-defined
independent of the application. Therefore, Subsection 2d requires that
any application-supplied
function or table used by this function must be optional: if the
application does not supply it, the square
root function must still compute square roots.)

These requirements apply to the modified work as a whole. If
identifiable sections of that work are not
derived from the Library, and can be reasonably considered independent
and separate works in
themselves, then this Licence, and its terms, do not apply to those
sections when you distribute them as
separate works. But when you distribute the same sections as part of a
whole which is a work based on
the Library, the distribution of the whole must be on the terms of this
Licence, whose permissions for
other Licensees extend to the entire whole, and thus to each and every
part regardless of who wrote it.

Thus, it is not the intent of this section to claim rights or contest
your rights to work written entirely by
you; rather, the intent is to exercise the right to control the
distribution of derivative or collective works
based on the Library.

In addition, mere aggregation of another work not based on the Library
with the Library (or with a
work based on the Library) on a volume of a storage or distribution
medium does not bring the other
work under the scope of this Licence.

3. You may opt to apply the terms of the ordinary GNU General Public
Licence instead of this Licence
to a given copy of the Library. To do this, you must alter all the
notices that refer to this Licence, so
that they refer to the ordinary GNU General Public Licence, version 2,
instead of to this Licence. (If a
newer version than version 2 of the ordinary GNU General Public Licence
has appeared, then you can
specify that version instead if you wish.) Do not make any other change
in these notices.

Once this change is made in a given copy, it is irreversible for that
copy, so the ordinary GNU General
Public Licence applies to all subsequent copies and derivative works
made from that copy.

This option is useful when you wish to copy part of the code of the
Library into a program that is not a
library.

4. You may copy and distribute the Library (or a portion or derivative
of it, under Section 2) in object
code or executable form under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above
provided that you accompany it
with the complete corresponding machine-readable source code, which must
be distributed under the
terms of Sections 1 and 2 above on a medium customarily used for
software interchange.

If distribution of object code is made by offering access to copy from a
designated place, then offering
equivalent access to copy the source code from the same place satisfies
the requirement to distribute
the source code, even though third parties are not compelled to copy the
source along with the object
code.

5. A program that contains no derivative of any portion of the Library,
but is designed to work with the
Library by being compiled or linked with it, is called a "work that uses
the Library". Such a work, in
isolation, is not a derivative work of the Library, and therefore falls
outside the scope of this Licence.

6. You may combine or link a "work that uses the Library" with the
Library to produce a work
containing portions of the Library, and distribute that work under terms
of your choice.

You must give prominent notice with each copy of the work that the
Library is used in it and that the
Library and its use are covered by this Licence. You must supply a copy
of this Licence. If the work
during execution displays copyright notices, you must include the
copyright notice for the Library
among them, as well as a reference directing the user to the copy of
this Licence. Also, you must do
one of these things:

a) Accompany the work with the complete corresponding machine-readable
source code for the
Library including whatever changes to the Library were used in the work
(which must be distributed
under Sections 1 and 2 above).

b) Use a suitable shared library mechanism for linking with the Library.
A suitable mechanism is one
that (1) uses at run time a copy of the library already present on the
user's computer system, rather than
copying library functions into the executable, and (2) will operate
properly with a modified version of
the library, if the user installs one, as long as the modified version
is interface-compatible with the
version that the work was made with.

c) Accompany the work with a written offer, valid for at least three
years, to give the same user the
materials specified in Subsection 6a, above, for a charge no more than
the cost of performing this
distribution.

d) If distribution of the work is made by offering access to copy from a
designated place, offer
equivalent access to copy the above specified materials from the same place.

e) Verify that the user has already received a copy of these materials
or that you have already sent this
user a copy.

7. You may place library facilities that are a work based on the Library
side-by-side in a single library
together with other library facilities not covered by this Licence, and
distribute such a combined library,
provided that the separate distribution of the work based on the Library
and of the other library
facilities is otherwise permitted, and provided that you do these two
things:

a) Accompany the combined library with a copy of the same work based on
the Library, uncombined
with any other library facilities. This must be distributed under the
terms of the Sections above.

b) Give prominent notice with the combined library of the fact that part
of it is a work based on the
Library, and explaining where to find the accompanying uncombined form
of the same work.

8. You may not copy, modify, sublicense, link with, or distribute the
Library except as expressly
provided under this Licence. Any attempt otherwise to copy, modify,
sublicense, link with, or
distribute the Library is void, and will automatically terminate your
rights under this Licence.
However, parties who have received copies, or rights, from you under
this Licence will not have their
Licences terminated so long as such parties remain in full compliance.

9. You are not required to accept this Licence, since you have not
signed it. However, nothing else
grants you permission to modify or distribute the Library or its
derivative works. These actions are
prohibited by law if you do not accept this Licence. Therefore, by
modifying or distributing the
Library (or any work based on the Library), you indicate your acceptance
of this Licence to do so, and
all its terms and conditions for copying, distributing or modifying the
Library or works based on it.

10. Each time you redistribute the Library (or any work based on the
Library), the recipient
automatically receives a Licence from the original licensor to copy,
distribute, link with or modify the
Library subject to these terms and conditions. You may not impose any
further restrictions on the
recipients' exercise of the rights granted herein. You are not
responsible for enforcing compliance by
third parties with this Licence.

11. If, as a consequence of a court judgment or allegation of patent
infringement or for any other reason
(not limited to patent issues), conditions are imposed on you (whether
by court order, agreement or
otherwise) that contradict the conditions of this Licence, they do not
excuse you from the conditions of
this Licence. If you cannot distribute so as to satisfy simultaneously
your obligations under this
Licence and any other pertinent obligations, then as a consequence you
may not distribute the Library
at all. For example, if a patent Licence would not permit royalty-free
redistribution of the Library by
all those who receive copies directly or indirectly through you, then
the only way you could satisfy
both it and this Licence would be to refrain entirely from distribution
of the Library.

If any portion of this section is held invalid or unenforceable under
any particular circumstance, the
balance of the section is intended to apply, and the section as a whole
is intended to apply in other
circumstances.

It is not the purpose of this section to induce you to infringe any
patents or other property right claims
or to contest validity of any such claims; this section has the sole
purpose of protecting the integrity of
the free software distribution system which is implemented by public
Licence practices. Many people
have made generous contributions to the wide range of software
distributed through that system in
reliance on consistent application of that system; it is up to the
author/donor to decide if he or she is
willing to distribute software through any other system and a licensee
cannot impose that choice.

This section is intended to make thoroughly clear what is believed to be
a consequence of the rest of
this Licence.

12. If the distribution and/or use of the Library is restricted in
certain countries either by patents or by
copyrighted interfaces, the original copyright holder who places the
Library under this Licence may
add an explicit geographical distribution limitation excluding those
countries, so that distribution is
permitted only in or among countries not thus excluded. In such case,
this Licence incorporates the
limitation as if written in the body of this Licence.

13. IUPAC and the InChI Trust Limited may publish revised and/or new
versions of the IUPAC/InChI
Trust Licence for the International Chemical Identifier (InChI) Software
from time to time. Such new
versions will be similar in spirit to the present version, but may
differ in detail to address new problems
or concerns.

Each version is given a distinguishing version number. If the Library
specifies a version number of
this Licence which applied to it and "any later version", you have the
option of following the terms and
conditions either of that version or of any later version published by
IUPAC and the InChI Trust
Limited.

14. If you wish to incorporate parts of the Library into other free
programs whose distribution
conditions are incompatible with these, write to the author to ask for
permission.

15. If you modify the Library in any way whatsoever, the output from any
such modified Library may
not be referred to as 'InChI' or any similar name. Any attempt to refer
to such output as 'InChI' will
automatically terminate your rights under this Licence.

NO WARRANTY

16. Because the Library is licensed free of charge, there is no warranty
for the Library, to the
extent permitted by applicable law. Except when otherwise stated in
writing the copyright
holders and other parties provide the Library "as is" without warranty
of any kind, either
expressed or implied, including, but not limited to, the implied
warranties of merchantability and
fitness for a particular purpose. The entire risk as to the quality and
performance of the Library
is with you. Should the Library prove defective, you assume the cost of
all necessary servicing,
repair or correction.

17. In no event unless required by applicable law or agreed to in
writing will any copyright
holder, or any party who may modify and/or redistribute the Library as
permitted above, be
liable to you for damages, including any general, special, incidental or
consequential damages
arising out of the use or inability to use the Library (including but
not limited to loss of data or
data being rendered inaccurate or losses sustained by you or third
parties or a failure of the
Library to operate with any other software), even if such holder or
other party has been advised
of the possibility of such damages.

END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Instructions for Use

You must attach the following notices to the library at the beginning of
each source file - as a
minimum each file needs to contain the "copyright" line and a link to
the full notice.

[INSERT YOUR LIBRARY'S NAME AND ITS PURPOSE]
Copyright (c) [YEAR][COPYRIGHT OWNER]
This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
under the terms of the
IUPAC/InChI Trust InChI Licence 1.0, or any later version.

Please note that this library is distributed WITHOUT ANY WARRANTIES
whatsoever,
whether expressed or implied. See the IUPAC/InChI Trust Licence for the
International
Chemical Identifier (InChI) Software ("IUPAC/InChI-Trust InChI Licence
No. 1.0") for
more details.

You should have received a copy of the IUPAC/InChI Trust InChI Licence
No. 1.0 with this
library; if not, please write to:

The InChI Trust
8 Cavendish Avenue
Cambridge CB1 7US
UK

or e-mail to ***@inchi-trust.org

In the event that you require anything else or have any questions,
please write to:

[INSERT COPYRIGHT OWNERS DETAILS]
[INSERT ADDRESS]

or contact us via email at: [INSERT EMAIL ADDRESS]


(c) 2011 IUPAC and InChI Trust Limited
Alex Mestiashvili
2018-02-26 15:53:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
Hi,
could you please clarify if the license below can be considered
DFSG-compatible ?
Section 2 doesn't sound very good, but section 3 says that GPL-2+ may be
applied.
Will it be fine to simply state that it is licensed under GPL-2+ and
also include the original license in d/copyright ?
It looks a like the LGPL-2. In any event, this license is fine as is.
If anyone wants to make modifications that are not allowed by the
existing text, then they can modify it under GPL-2+ terms. There are
other examples in the archive of this (e.g. CECILL).
Cheers,
Walter Landry
I see. Now I also found this license (thanks to codesearch.debian.net)
in openbabel package as LGPL-2.1 compatible.

Thank you!
Alex
Francesco Poli
2018-02-26 21:16:57 UTC
Permalink
[...]
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
It looks a like the LGPL-2. In any event, this license is fine as is.
If anyone wants to make modifications that are not allowed by the
existing text, then they can modify it under GPL-2+ terms. There are
other examples in the archive of this (e.g. CECILL).
Cheers,
Walter Landry
I see. Now I also found this license (thanks to codesearch.debian.net)
in openbabel package as LGPL-2.1 compatible.
Hello.

This "IUPAC/InChI-Trust InChI Licence No. 1.0" appears to have been
created starting from the GNU LGPL v2.1, by the following steps:

0) remove the preamble

1) change the license name

2) use the British spelling for the word "license" (that is to say,
"licence")

3) add the definition of "IUPAC"

4) add one explicit clarification to clause 2c, which states that
the requirement does not extend to any "work that uses the Library"

5) drop some reasoning about executable binaries as derivative works in
section 5

6) relax some requirements on distribution of "works that use the
Library" in section 6

7) add a new section 15 which includes a non-free restriction
on how you can refer to the output of a modified library:

| 15. If you modify the Library in any way whatsoever, the output from
| any such modified Library may not be referred to as 'InChI' or any
| similar name. Any attempt to refer to such output as 'InChI' will
| automatically terminate your rights under this Licence.

8) rephrase the instructions for use of the license


I think this license contributes to the (bad) license proliferation
festival that we sadly continue to witness.
In my own personal opinion, it includes at least one non-free
restriction (in its section 15), but, luckily, is one-way convertible
to the GNU GPL version 2 or later.
Hence, I think that a work solely licensed under the terms of this
"IUPAC/InChI-Trust InChI Licence No. 1.0" complies or may be made to
comply with the DFSG.
But we have to remember that such a work can be considered as DFSG-free
only as long as it is not linked with GPL-incompatible works!


I am not sure which is the usual practice in Debian for cases like this:
should the conversion-to-GPL be explicitly performed while packaging the
work and the original license just mentioned in the debian/copyright
file for completeness' sake?
or should the work be left as-is (with the original license in the
debian/copyright file), thus relying on the possibility to apply the GPL
whenever the need arises?

What do other debian-legal regulars think?
--
http://www.inventati.org/frx/
There's not a second to spare! To the laboratory!
..................................................... Francesco Poli .
GnuPG key fpr == CA01 1147 9CD2 EFDF FB82 3925 3E1C 27E1 1F69 BFFE
Ole Streicher
2018-02-26 21:28:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Francesco Poli
This "IUPAC/InChI-Trust InChI Licence No. 1.0" appears to have been
The LGPL-2.1 starts with

| Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
| of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I am therefore wondering whether the IUPAC/... license text violates
itself the LGPL license conditions and cannot be distributed in Debian
at all?

Cheers

Ole
Mihai Moldovan
2018-02-26 21:51:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ole Streicher
The LGPL-2.1 starts with
| Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
| of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I am therefore wondering whether the IUPAC/... license text violates
itself the LGPL license conditions and cannot be distributed in Debian
at all?
IANAL: they have not changed LGPL-2.1, but copied it and released it under a
different name.

As far as I understand, it would only be violating LGPL-2.1, if the text was
changed, but the original name retained (since in such a case, naturally, you'd
be getting something that isn't LGPL-2.1 under the LGPL-2.1 name).

By changing the name as well, they made clear that this is not LGPL-2.1, so I do
not see any violation.



Mihai
Francesco Poli
2018-02-26 22:12:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mihai Moldovan
Post by Ole Streicher
The LGPL-2.1 starts with
| Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
| of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I am therefore wondering whether the IUPAC/... license text violates
itself the LGPL license conditions and cannot be distributed in Debian
at all?
IANAL: they have not changed LGPL-2.1, but copied it and released it under a
different name.
As far as I understand, it would only be violating LGPL-2.1, if the text was
changed, but the original name retained (since in such a case, naturally, you'd
be getting something that isn't LGPL-2.1 under the LGPL-2.1 name).
By changing the name as well, they made clear that this is not LGPL-2.1, so I do
not see any violation.
There's probably no violation, I think, since the FSF explicitly
[permits](https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html#ModifyGPL)
the creation of a modified variant of the GNU GPL, under a different
name, with changed instructions-for-use, without the preamble, and
without any mention of GNU.

I suppose the same rules hold for the GNU LGPL...

Anyway, please note that the FSF recommends against contributing to
license proliferation!
--
http://www.inventati.org/frx/
There's not a second to spare! To the laboratory!
..................................................... Francesco Poli .
GnuPG key fpr == CA01 1147 9CD2 EFDF FB82 3925 3E1C 27E1 1F69 BFFE
Ole Streicher
2018-02-26 21:58:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mihai Moldovan
Post by Ole Streicher
The LGPL-2.1 starts with
| Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
| of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I am therefore wondering whether the IUPAC/... license text violates
itself the LGPL license conditions and cannot be distributed in Debian
at all?
IANAL: they have not changed LGPL-2.1, but copied it and released it under a
different name.
Since the license text itself if copyrighted, its usage (and possible
modification) has to follow the license conditions.
Post by Mihai Moldovan
As far as I understand, it would only be violating LGPL-2.1, if the text was
changed, but the original name retained (since in such a case, naturally, you'd
be getting something that isn't LGPL-2.1 under the LGPL-2.1 name).
The license explicitly forbids the change, independent of whether the
result is distributed under the same or under a different name.

Best

Ole
Dmitry Alexandrov
2018-02-26 17:03:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
could you please clarify if the license below can be considered
DFSG-compatible ?
Section 2 doesn't sound very good
That’s extremely interesting. Could you elaborate, please?

I did not wdiff(1) it, but it definitely sounds like a word-for-word copy of second GNU Lesser GPL to me. :-)
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
but section 3 says that GPL-2+ may be applied.
Sure. The other sections gave me the same impression.
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
Will it be fine to simply state that it is licensed under GPL-2+
Why?
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
and also include the original license in d/copyright?
Alex Mestiashvili
2018-02-26 19:52:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dmitry Alexandrov
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
could you please clarify if the license below can be considered
DFSG-compatible ?
Section 2 doesn't sound very good
That’s extremely interesting. Could you elaborate, please?
I did not wdiff(1) it, but it definitely sounds like a word-for-word copy of second GNU Lesser GPL to me. :-)
Well, I am afraid it's not really interesting. Obviously I've never
actually read the text of LGPL, and misinterpret the section 2,
especially subsection c). There are way to many "musts" to my taste :)
Post by Dmitry Alexandrov
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
but section 3 says that GPL-2+ may be applied.
Sure. The other sections gave me the same impression.
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
Will it be fine to simply state that it is licensed under GPL-2+
Why?
Why what ?
This question is not relevant anymore after I realized that the license
in the topic is a hidden LGPL.

Best regards,
Alex
Ben Finney
2018-02-26 22:40:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dmitry Alexandrov
I did not wdiff(1) it, but it definitely sounds like a word-for-word
copy of second GNU Lesser GPL to me. :-)
To the extent that text is derived from the GNU LGPL, it is a copyright
violation:

Copyright (C) 1991, 1999 Free Software Foundation, Inc. […]
Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.

<URL:https://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/lgpl-2.1.html>

Copyright © 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc. […]
Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this
license document, but changing it is not allowed.

So, as a separate matter, it appears the distributors of
IUPAC/InChi-Trust License are in violation of copyright law.

This would AFAICT include any redistributor, which would preclude having
the work in Debian.
--
\ “I wish I had a dollar for every time I spent a dollar, because |
`\ then, yahoo!, I'd have all my money back.” —Jack Handey |
_o__) |
Ben Finney
Ben Finney
2018-02-26 22:49:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ben Finney
To the extent that text is derived from the GNU LGPL, it is a copyright
I didn't explain well enough why I was including some of the text.
Post by Ben Finney
Copyright (C) 1991, 1999 Free Software Foundation, Inc. […]
Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
<URL:https://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/lgpl-2.1.html>
Copyright © 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc. […]
Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this
license document, but changing it is not allowed.
<URL:https://www.gnu.org/licenses/lgpl.html>

I showed both of those to show that the requirement has not changed
between versions (so it is sufficient to determine that the text is
derived from either version of the GNU LGPL).
--
\ “It is the integrity of each individual human that is in final |
`\ examination. On personal integrity hangs humanity's fate.” |
_o__) —Richard Buckminster Fuller, _Critical Path_, 1981 |
Ben Finney
Francesco Poli
2018-02-27 22:29:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ben Finney
Post by Ben Finney
To the extent that text is derived from the GNU LGPL, it is a copyright
[...]
Post by Ben Finney
I showed both of those to show that the requirement has not changed
between versions (so it is sufficient to determine that the text is
derived from either version of the GNU LGPL).
Hello Ben,
I assume you have read my latest
[reply](https://lists.debian.org/debian-legal/2018/02/msg00034.html)
in this thread.

Do you think that the rules for modifications of the GPL text do not
hold for modifications of the LGPL text?
Could you please elaborate a bit?
--
http://www.inventati.org/frx/
There's not a second to spare! To the laboratory!
..................................................... Francesco Poli .
GnuPG key fpr == CA01 1147 9CD2 EFDF FB82 3925 3E1C 27E1 1F69 BFFE
Alex Mestiashvili
2018-03-02 21:21:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
Hi,
could you please clarify if the license below can be considered
DFSG-compatible ?
Section 2 doesn't sound very good, but section 3 says that GPL-2+ may be
applied.
Will it be fine to simply state that it is licensed under GPL-2+ and
also include the original license in d/copyright ?
Thank you,
Alex
http://www.inchi-trust.org/download/105/LICENCE.pdf
Thank you all for such a detailed answers!

I found the following in the FAQ[0]:

3.2. Is InChI open?

It is intended that the source code is freely re-usable and a license
has been developed to reflect that. Since the InChI source code has a
normative role (i.e. it acts as the final arbiter of the correctness) it
is not freely modifiable, although it is open to anybody to view and
build an InChI binary.

To my limited understanding this render the software non-free as it
fails for example the desert island test, though it is understandable
why they require the code to be not-modifiable.
Or am I missing the point?

I am CC-ing Debichem mailing list, as InChi is a chemistry software.
The beginning of the thread is here:

https://lists.debian.org/debian-legal/2018/02/msg00026.html


[0] https://www.inchi-trust.org/technical-faq/#3
Francesco Poli
2018-03-02 22:03:59 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 2 Mar 2018 22:21:01 +0100 Alex Mestiashvili wrote:

[...]
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
Thank you all for such a detailed answers!
You're welcome!
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
3.2. Is InChI open?
It is intended that the source code is freely re-usable and a license
has been developed to reflect that. Since the InChI source code has a
normative role (i.e. it acts as the final arbiter of the correctness) it
is not freely modifiable, although it is open to anybody to view and
build an InChI binary.
The answer for this FAQ does not seem to be factually correct.

The license we are talking about allows modifications (see its section
2) and also allows the licensee to apply the terms of the GNU GPL v2 or
later (see section 3), which, in its turn, allows modifications...

I am puzzled.
Post by Alex Mestiashvili
To my limited understanding this render the software non-free as it
fails for example the desert island test, though it is understandable
why they require the code to be not-modifiable.
Or am I missing the point?
A work which is not modifiable fails to meet DFSG#3 and is therefore
utterly non-free.
However, as I said, the license under consideration does not seem to
forbid modifications, as far as I can see...
--
http://www.inventati.org/frx/
There's not a second to spare! To the laboratory!
..................................................... Francesco Poli .
GnuPG key fpr == CA01 1147 9CD2 EFDF FB82 3925 3E1C 27E1 1F69 BFFE
Loading...